Denmark's closed care accomodation model is designed to have a home-like feel and houses blend in with the local neighbourhood

CASE STUDY: The Danish model for aged care

People in Denmark pay a lot of tax, but it means they know they will be cared for. Nearly all home care and nursing home costs are paid for through municipal taxes and government grants.

Long-term care in Denmark means aged care is designed to be as little like institutionalised care as possible. “Close-care accommodation” is designed to have a home-like feel and houses blend in with the local neighbourhood. For those that want to stay at home, up to 24-hour home care is available for free for people aged 67 or older. For people 75 or older, they receive 2 nurse visits a year. The Danish model is all about ensuring older people are happier and healthier in the later stages of their life.

A state of the art facility in Aalborg, Denmark will soon utilising technology and public spaces to revolutionise the concept of the aged care facility. It includes a physical rehabilitation robot and a mobility monitoring system, which aims to prevent residents from developing pressure ulcers.

Image source: Nordic Co-operation website (norden.org)

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